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Olympia Area Advanced Practice Association

Items of Interest from the HHS Office on Women's Health - Region 10

Posted over 3 years ago by Pat Sonnenstuhl

Here are the Items of Interest from the HHS Office on Women's Health - Region 10 for October 6th. (New and improved! Click on the links below to be taken directly to that item.)

1. QHDO Trainings
2. CDC Identifies Promising Strategies for Preventing Sexual Violence
3. US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on Chlamydia/Gonorrhea and Research Plan on Syphilis
4. Breast Pumps and Insurance Coverage: What You Need To Know

1. Quick Health Data Online Trainings

We are pleased to announce the availability of telephone trainings on the Office on Women's Health online information system – Quick Health Data Online. The system contains data on demographics, mortality, reproductive and maternal health, disease incidence, and access to care at the county level for all states and territories; additionally, data are included on prevention, violence, and mental health at the state level. To the extent possible, data are provided by race, ethnicity and gender, and where applicable/available, by age. Also, the system incorporates graphing and mapping features so that the data of interest can be used directly as tables, graphs/chart and maps.

There are two trainings per month. The basic training will provide an overview of the system and the focus on mapping/second training will provide an emphasis on mapping techniques. The trainings are repeated on various days to allow anyone who wishes to participate, an opportunity to do so.

The training will last one hour, and you can be sitting at your desk using your computer. The dates and times available for the sessions are as follows: Please go the link http://www.healthstatus2020.com/ then click on the free trainings to register.

Quick Health Data Online 101 trainings:

Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014 3:00 – 4:00 pm ET Basic training
Thursday, Oct 16, 2014 1:00 - 2: 00 pm ET Focus on mapping

Monday, Nov 17, 2014 4:00 - 5:00 pm ET Basic training
Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014 11:00 am -12:00 pm ET Focus on mapping

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014 2:00- 3:00 pm ET Basic training
Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014 1:00 – 2:00 pm ET Focus on mapping

2. CDC Identifies Promising Strategies for Preventing Sexual Violence

Using evidence from sexual violence intervention research helps prevention outcomes
The CDC has conducted a review of programs designed to prevent sexual violence perpetration. The findings identified strategies that are working, not effective, and showing promise.
"A Systematic Review of Primary Prevention Strategies for Sexual Violence" in Aggression and Violent Behavior found two primary prevention programs and a policy initiative with strong evidence of effectiveness for reducing rates of sexually violent behavior:
• Safe Dates
• Shifting Boundaries, building-level intervention; and
• The 1994 U.S. Violence Against Women Act.

Other approaches with a focus on bystander training and healthy relationships are also promising.
What Works & Doesn't Work to Stop Sexual Violence Perpetration
• Comprehensive prevention strategies that address various factors and contexts affecting risk for sexual violence perpetration are more likely to be effective.
• Research suggests that brief education and awareness programs focusing on increasing knowledge or changing attitudes do not work by themselves.
• Communities are encouraged to consider effective practices and best-available evidence when building comprehensive strategies for sexual violence prevention.

Key Findings
The National Sexual Violence Resource Center has released insights from this article in their Key Findings resource. Discover what findings mean for violence prevention practitioners and professionals.
Learn More
• CDC: Sexual Violence Prevention
• Rape Prevention and Education Program
• National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey
• Understanding Sexual Violence Factsheet
• The National Sexual Violence Resource Center

3. US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on Chlamydia/Gonorrhea and Research Plan on Syphilis
From the US Preventive Services Task Force:

Final recommendation statement on Screening for Chlamydia and Screening for Gonorrhea
The Task Force posted its final recommendation statement on Screening for Chlamydia and Screening for Gonorrhea on its website on September 23. The USPSTF recommends screening for chlamydia in sexually active women age 24 years or younger and in older women who are at increased risk for infection (B recommendation). The USPSTF recommends screening for gonorrhea in sexually active women age 24 years or younger and in older women who are at increased risk for infection (B recommendation). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in men (I statement). The Recommendation has already been cited in a CDC article on Chlamydia rates in the US published in MMWR.

Final research plan on Screening for Syphilis Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults
The Task Force posted its final research plan on Screening for Syphilis Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults on its website on September 18. The final Research Plan is used to guide a systematic review of the evidence by researchers at an Evidence-based Practice Center. The plan was revised based on comments received during the four week public comment period earlier this year. The resulting Evidence Report will form the basis of the Task Force's recommendation statement on this topic.

4. Breast Pumps and Insurance Coverage: What You Need To Know

During National Breastfeeding Month in August, the OWH heard lots of questions about breast pumps and insurance coverage. The decision to breastfeed is a personal one, but with everyone from Grandma to girlfriends giving you advice, it can be overwhelming to sort out all of the facts. We're here with the information you're looking for on breast pumps and health insurance. Check out these commonly asked questions (and answers).
https://www.womenshealth.gov/blog/breast-pumps-insurance